Cavern of the Kashgharl Stream

The Cavern of the Kashgharl Stream is now mostly forgotten, a remote, crumbling village near the cliffs where the entrance is found. But, hundreds of years ago, it was a bustling town where the Shkevdak Dictators regularly sent their fearsome Yellow Mask soldiers for weapons training.

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The cavern itself was carved out of the rock to provide access to the small freshwater stream found in a natural cave.

The Yellow Masks believed that the waters of the Kashgharl Stream imbued their swords with magical properties, and squadrons of soldiers would occupy the cavern complex for a series of special rituals known only to the Yellow Masks themselves.

The bridge crossing the stream is an elaborately carved and skillfully crafted work of stone masonry.  The majority of the stone used in the bridge seems to match the local rock that the rest of the complex is carved into, there are also numerous individual stones that clearly come from other origins.  Most of these have figural carvings on their exposed faces, but many of them are carved in different styles (and with different inscriptions) than those on the majority of the bridge.

The chasm that the bridge spans is nearly 40 feet deep, with accumulations of boulders and loose rock at the base of the cliffs which give way to a sandy ground.  The stream is only a couple feet deep at its deepest parts.  The ledge making the border of the large pool that the stream pours over is about 8 feet above the water level in the pond, although this will vary by as much as a couple of feet over time, depending on the flow rate of the water.  The pool is at least 60 feet deep, but there are numerous small crevices too small for a person to fit into which extend even deeper.  Presumably, these openings connect to underground streams to allow the water to keep from filling the cavern.

As usual, feel free to use for any non-commercial purpose, or contact me if you’d like to use this on a commercial project.

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