Archive for December, 2016

Exquisite Corpse Dungeon 4

December 28, 2016

Are you in need of a last minute holiday mega dungeon? Then let us help you out with the biggest Exquisite Corpse Dungeon yet.  There are acres of passages, chambers, caverns, and more for you to explore.

A link to a PDF of the full-size (56″ x 12″) version of the map is at the bottom of this post.This is a reduced (but hopefully still somewhat readable) image of the whole map.
ecd4-final

The Exquisite Corpse project has multiple participants who each have to construct a section of dungeon without seeing any of what has already been done.  For these maps, there is a tiny sliver of the previous section that shows where the connections should be, and then they have to map a section. Then they send a tiny sliver of their section to the next person who follows the same steps.  So there is no internal coordination, but something wonderful arises from the blind collaboration.

Sections of this one were drawn by Billy Longino, Kosmic Dungeon, Tony Obert, Jens larsen, Kevin Campbell, Rodger Thorm, David Millar, Paul Baldowski, Andrew Durston, Ivan Katyurgin, Nate McD, Christian Kessler, and Scott Aleric.

Since this is number 4, there must be some previous ones, right?  If you’re looking for more massive, collaborative dungeon art, here are links to the previous Exquisite Corpse projects:


And lastly, here is the link to the full-size 56″ x 12″ PDF: exquisitecorpse4final

Exquisite Corpse 4 – final stretch

December 27, 2016

The latest Exquisite Corpse Dungeon is under final review by all the contributors, and tomorrow (12/28) should be the public unveiling of the whole thing.  Check back here for the update.

Anyone looking to print this out should be aware that the final version is 56 x 12 inches (that’s 1422 x 305 mm if you’re more metric minded)  We’ll try to have a smaller version available that won’t choke everyone’s bandwidth.

 

 

Hexes and Squares

December 22, 2016

There are two ways to grid a map for game play.  The Cartesian grid is very familiar, and easy to access, given our familiarity with graph paper.  But rules for movement are more complicated when figuring out diagonal moves on a rectilinear grid.  So, the other alternative, which was taken up by wargamers decades ago, was to use a hex grid.  Hexes are the other geometric figure that can tile the plane regularly.  And there are no issues with diagonal movement with a hex grid.

hex-sqdiagx

 

 

But I’ve been kicking around some other ideas  for a while.  One easy adaptation that is midway between hexes and a square grid is to stagger the grid cells.  A half-cell offset in the rows of squares gives you the same overall orientation and even tiling as a hex grid, but with fewer of the non-perpendicular lines that may be what makes hexes daunting for many people.

To make the lines more distinct and readable, this version turns an overlaid square grid at a 45 degree angle, so that the two grids are both readily identifiable without overlapping one another.

The scale for this is the smaller (hex-replacing) squares are 4′ on a side, so the larger, diagonal squares are then slightly more than 11′ on a side.  I think that’s workably close to a 10′ D&D dungeon square overlaid with a 1-figure sized space

Edit to add (12/22):  Of course, I am an idiot, and these should not be true squares in order to evenly match a hex grid.  But, for most purposes, I think it’s simpler and easier to do the basic running bond squares as “good enough.”

Edit to add (12/22): Stephan Beal followed up with this comment on G+

By sheer cosmic coincidence i stumbled across an article in Space Gamer Issue 30 this morning which places an exact year on the introduction of the hex in games:

>>>Hexes in wargames go back to 1952, when they were used in some of the government-sponsored “think tanks.” In commercial wargames, hexes were first used in 1961.<<<

Space Gamer issue 30, page 20:

http://www.warehouse23.com/products/space-gamer-number-30

Intersection Z

December 14, 2016

encounterz

This is the last of this Cycle of the Intersection series.

Collection: Mapvember 2016

December 2, 2016

A number of map makers took on Miska Fredman’s challenge to create 30 maps in 30 days, with a list of elements or prompts for the series.  I managed to do 15, which is okay by me.

If you haven’t been following this on Google+, my set of maps are beneath the cut.  The whole thing might take a while to load, so be patient.

Definitely not going for a singular style or a common element in these.  Several are section maps, which seem to be popular.  A few are really simple quick-and-dirty sketches to get the idea down.  Others are a bit more refined.  I dropped some digital color into a couple to make them read better, but they’re all pretty straight from pen to post. (more…)