Archive for the ‘Orphaned Games and Sites’ Category

DragonQuest combat rules retro-clone resource

April 22, 2016

There is now a very basic outline version of the DragonQuest combat rules posted at DQRules.  I’m providing extra notice here for those of you who are following Antherwyck House for DQ-related stuff since there are more followers here than there are on DQRules itself.  There are PDF and .DOC versions, as well as a pretty bare plain text, so hopefully at least one of those will provide a useful version.

This is just the bare bones of the DQ combat rules, but is probably enough to run combats if you already have some familiarity with the game.  More importantly, it is the basic skeleton on which the system is built, so a retro-clone would start with this framework and expand out to flesh things out once more.

The other series of questions to be considered are regarding whether any of these core rules should be modified or revised as part of the new version of DQ.  A total retro-clone would stick to this with very little deviation, but a new edition of DQ should consider improvements and modifications.

Before things get too in-depth, this needs to be the next set of considerations.  There are some ideas already being kicked around, but additional feedback would be especially useful for this project.

What Should the DragonQuest Retro-Clone Be Called?

April 12, 2016

DQcoverI’ve opened up the idea of assembling a retro-clone of DragonQuest, but one question to be answered is: What should it be called?

For a long time, I was interested in using the original name for DQ: DragonSlayer (before a now long-forgotten movie of the same name came along, and SPI shifted the name of their FRPG in order to use that title for an equally long-forgotten tie-in game).  DragonSlayer would be a good name with a historical connection to the game, but things have become more complicated.

In the same realm of retro-clones and throwback games and the like, there is now a title called “Crimson Dragon Slayer” by Venger Satanis.  And given the potential for confusion between the two names (as well as the fact that he also publishes through OneBookShelf, as does Antherwyck House Games), that option is now much more problematic.

Also, even among the grognards and the long-time fans of DragonQuest, not a lot of them know the early alternate name, and no one looking for things related to DragonQuest is likely to be looking for things under another name, so it would have very little benefit to have a different name in order for people looking for DQ-related materials to find it.

There is also the Nintendo videogame series called “DragonQuest” that is often a point of confusion.  A new name might help distinguish between the RPG and the videogame, particularly since the latter is still actively being produced and promoted.

There is also the project organized through the Yahoo Groups called DragonQuest Open Source or Open DQ.  But OpenDQ is also a name for a data quality software project.

Retro-clones of other games need to avoid using the name of the original source, because those companies are still in business, and their trademarks for the original title are still active.  That is not the case with DQ.  So a name with “DQ” or “DragonQuest” in the title shouldn’t be challenged on that front.  The videogame might be more of a point of conflict.

So, it seems to be open season for a new name for the game.

This seems completely open for new ideas and discussion, so I hope you will add your suggestions to the mix.

Very, Very Meta-

June 23, 2015

There’s something almost mind-breakingly meta about finding an article about saving orphaned RPGs by using the Wayback Machine, and searching through a blog that is itself now gone except for the archive.

And it’s exponentially more bizarre for me to come across, because of who it cites in the article:

Rodger Thorm spots a Boing Boing post about copyright and points out the implications for RPGs. The US Copyright Office is looking into the need for a system to clear the rights for orphaned copyrighted works with no visible rightsholder. They want public comment, since they’re trying to figure out what the pros and cons are of various potential courses of action with regard to orphaned works.

As Rodger points out, there’s a ton of this kind of thing in the RPG field. If you’re a creator or a fan of an orphaned RPG — not one that the rightsholders won’t publish, but one for which the rightsholders are unknown — it might be worth your while to submit a comment according to the process outlined.

https://web.archive.org/web/20050208000554/http://www.20by20room.com/2005/01/saving_orphaned.html

There’s also a reminder in there that I had another blog (now orphaned and forgotten; it’s a theme).  I think that the few bits that were there got migrated elsewhere (perhaps the early tail of this one, in fact), but I should go back and see what was there.