DragonQuest rules outline

I. INTRODUCTION
II. HOW TO PLAY THE GAME
1. GENERAL COURSE OF EVENTS
2. REQUIREMENTS FOR PLAY
[2.1] The DragonQuest rules are intended to guide the GM. not to restrict him.
[2.2] A Tactical Display is used in conjunction with the Combat rules
[2.3] The figures occupying the display are either miniatures, cardboard counters, or other suitable markers.
[2.4] Percentile dice will be needed by both the players and the GM.
[2.5] The players must provide themselves with some miscellaneous play aids.
[2.6] The abbreviation “D” stands for “die” or “dice.”
[2.7] The roll on a single or percentile die-roll may never be modified below 1.
[2.8] The gamesmaster is advised to keep some information, particularly dice-rolls, secret during adventure.

III. GAME TERMS
IV. CHARACTER GENERATION
3. DESCRIPTION OF CHARACTERISTICS
[3.1] Physical Strength is a measure of a character’s muscle co-ordination and strength.
[3.2] Manual Dexterity is a measure of a character’s digital control.
[3.3] Agility is a measure of a character’s ability to maneuver his body and the speed at which he moves.
[3.4] Endurance is a measure of the punishment a character’s body can absorb before he becomes unconscious, sustains mortal wounds, or dies.
[3.5] Magic Aptitude is a measure of a character’s ability to harness and direct magical energies.
[3.6] Willpower is a measure of a character’s control of his mind and body especially in stress situations.
[3.7] Fatigue is a measure of the length of time that a character can sustain activities requiring a great deal of physical or mental exertion.
[3.8] Perception is a measure of a character’s intuition developed as a result of his experience.
[3.9] Physical Beauty is a measure of a character’s exterior attractiveness (or repulsiveness), as perceived by a member of a humanoid race.
4. EFFECTS OF CHARACTERISTICS
[4.1] If a character attempts a feasible task not specifically explained in a rule, the gamesmaster
derives a percentage chance of the character succeeding.
[4.2] The only magic task not described in the rules which may be attempted by a character is a feat of minor magic.
[4.3] The information given the players by the GM will sometimes depend upon a player’s Perception characteristic.
[4.4] The effects of an optional characteristic must be determined by the gamesmaster.
5. CHARACTERISTIC GENERATION
[5.1] Each player begins the game with a randomly determined number of Characteristic Points from which to assign values to his character’s primary characteristics.
[5.2] The minimum value that a player may assign to a primary characteristic is 5, and the maximum value is determined by the maximum for his characteristic point total.
[5.3] The value of a character’s Fatigue is a direct function of his Endurance.
[5.4] A character’s Perception value begins at 8.
[5.5] An optional characteristic is usually generated randomly.
[5.6] A character’s Tactical Movement Rate (see 14.1) is a direct function of his Agility.

6. BIRTHRIGHTS
[6.1] A player may choose the gender of his (or her) character.
[6.2] A player must determine whether his character’s Primary Hand is his right or his left.
[6.3] A player may always choose to be a human character. If the player wishes his character to be non-human, he has three chances to roll within one of the indicated ranges.
[6.4] A dwarf is a stout, usually taciturn humanoid who frequents mountainous areas.
[6.5] An elf is a lithe humanoid, of joyful demeanor, who frequents wooded areas.
[6.6] A giant is a huge, slightly prognathous humanoid. Whose existence stems from deep elemental magic.
[6.7] A halfling is a short, sleepy humanoid, who frequents halfling-constructed burrows.
[6.8] An orc is a stoop-shouldered, surly humanoid who is nomadic by nature.
[6.9] A shape-changer is a separate genetic strain of human, with the ability to change into the form of a particular animal.
7. ASPECTS
[7.1] Each player randomly determines the aspect of his character.
[7.2] A character is affected by a seasonal aspect during the season of his aspect and during the season which does not share an equinox or solstice with the season of his aspect.
[7.3] A character of solar or lunar aspect is affected by his aspect at high noon and midnight.
[7.4] A character of life or death aspect is affected by a birth or death in his immediate vicinity.
8. HERITAGE
[8.1] The player must determine the social status of his character’s parents.
[8.2] A player must determine his character’s legitimacy, and his standing (if any) vis a vis his siblings.
[8.3] The character’s order of birth modifies his initial allotment of experience and monies.
[8.4] A player may wish to know the exact order in which his character was born, if he is listed as a “legitimate child.”
[8.5] A player now determines his character’s initial allotment of Silver Pennies and Experience Points.
[8.6] A character may expend his initial allotment of Experience Points and/or Silver Pennies before ever going on an adventure.
[8.7] The player has completely generated his character.
[8.8] The player should choose a name for his character.

V. COMBAT
9. COMBAT TERMINOLOGY
10. COMBAT EOUIPMENT
11. PREPARATION FOR COMBAT
[11.1] Prior to placing the hostile figures on the display, the GM determines whether a surprise situation exists.
[11.2] After placing all the figures on the display, the GM assigns any Fatigue losses the figures may have incurred as a result of their actions prior to combat.
12. COMBAT SEQUENCE
[12. 1] A Pulse is a 5-second increment of time used to regulate all actions in combat situations.
[12.2] At the beginning of a Pulse, Initiative must be determined for all non-engaged figures.
[12.3] For engaged figures, Initiative is determined by comparing each figure’s Initiative Value.
[12.4] An engagement is defined as any number of figures occupying adjacent hexes, occupying the same hex, or any combination thereof.
[12.5] When a figure chooses an action, it is assumed to be performing that action until it may choose again.
13. ACTIONS OF ENGAGED FIGURES
[13.1] An engaged figure may Melee attack any figure within his Melee Zone,
[13.2] An engaged figure may Evade,
[13.3] An engaged figure may Withdraw.
[13.4] An engaged figure may take any Pass action.
[13.5] An Adept who is engaged may attempt to cast a spell.
[13.6] An engaged figure may attempt to Close and Grapple.
[13.7] A figure engaged in Close combat may attempt to Grapple, Pass or Withdraw.
14. ACTIONS OF NON-ENGAGED FIGURES
[14.1] A non-engaged figure may move any number of hexes up to its Tactical Movement Rate (TMR).
[14.2] A non-engaged figure may move up to 1/2 (rounded down) of his TMR and attempt to Melee attack with a non-pole weapon. and this action is a Charge.
[14.3] A non-engaged figure may move up to his full TMR and attempt to Melee attack with a Pole weapon, and this action is a Charge.
[14.4] A non-engaged figure may move up to 1/2 of his TMR (rounded down) and attempt to Grapple, and this is a Charge and Close.
[14.5] A non-engaged figure may move up to 1/2 (rounded down) of his full TMR and Evade as he moves.
[14.6] A non-engaged figure may move up to 2 hexes directly backward, and this is a Retreat.
[14.7] A non-engaged figure may fire a Missile or Thrown Weapon. or loose a Spell, and these are all Fire actions.
[14.8] A non-engaged figure may move up to two hexes and perform any Pass action.
15. ACTION CHOICE RESTRICTIONS
[15.1] Figures with a modified Agility of 8 or less are allowed one less hex of movement when executing any of the following actions: Melee attack, Evade, Retreat, Pass, and Charge with a Pole Weapon.
[15.2] Figures with a modified Agility of 22 through 25 are allowed one extra hex of movement when executing any of the following actions: Melee attack. Evade. Withdraw, Pass, and Retreat.
[15.3] Figures with modified Agilities of 26 and above may combine any two of the following actions in a single Pulse: Melee attack, Evade, Withdraw, Pass. Close and Grapple, Grapple. Charge, Charge and Close. Retreat, and Fire.
[15.4] A figure who becomes Stunned may attempt no other action except try to recover from being Stunned.
[15.5] A figure’s choice of combat actions is limited by his position relative to the intended target of his attack.
[15.6] If an Adept attempts to cast a spell while either being Ranged attacked or Melee attacked, he must perform a Concentration Check (see 29.5).
[15.7] The Action Summary lists all actions and their restrictions.
16. ATTACKING
[16.1] A figure may attempt to attack a hostile figure he is not adjacent to via Ranged Combat by executing a Fire action.
[16.2] A figure may attempt to Melee attack any hostile figure who occupies at least one hex of his Melee Zone.
[16.3] A figure may attempt to attack any figure who occupies the same hex only via Close combat by executing a Grapple action.
[16.4] A figure who is armed with either two prepared weapons or one two-handed class B weapon may attempt a Multiple Strike. [16.5] A figure attempting to attack may specify any one of the following special attacks:
Trip
Entangle
Restrain.
Knockout.
Shield Rush.
Disarm
17. RESOLVING ATTEMPTED ATTACKS
[17.1] The Strike Chance of an attacking figure is a combination of the Chance of the weapon or attack form plus modifiers for Rank and Manual Dexterity.
[17.2] An attacker’s Modified Strike Chance is equal to its Strike Chance minus the target’s Defense plus any modifications for attack type and attack conditions.
[17.3] Whenever the Strike Check results in a roll of 99 or 100. the attacker may have either dropped or broken his weapon.
[17.4] Whenever the Strike Check result is 30 or more above the Modified Strike Chance, the target may have Parried the attack.
[17.5] A figure’s Defense Rating is a combination of his modified Agility plus any defense afforded by a prepared shield.
[17.6] Each attack type (Ranged, Melee, or Close) has its own list of Strike Chance modifications.
[17.7] The charts listing modifiers used in calculating the Modified Strike Chance of any attack include the Shield Chart. Ranged Combat Chart. Melee Combat Chart, Close Combat Chart. Lighting Conditions Chart, and the Miscellaneous Conditions Chart.
18. DAMAGE
[18.1] Damage affecting Fatigue is absorbed by armor.
[18.2] A Strike Check of 15% or less of the Modified Strike Chance results in damage directly affecting Endurance which is never absorbed by armor, and the stricken figure always takes the full amount of the damage.
[18.3] Grievous Injuries may result if the successful Strike Check is 5% or less of the Modified Strike Chance.
[18.4] Damage incurred as a result of a magical attack is applied differently.
[18.5] (Optional Rule) The damage done with a particular weapon may be increased due to exceptional Physical Strength or Rank.
19. THE EFFECTS OF DAMAGE
20. WEAPONS
[20. 1] A figure need not use any normal weapon to attack.
[20.2] The Weapons Chart lists an normal weapons and their characteristics.
[20.3] Figures may, at the GM’s discretion, employ envenomed weapons.
[20.4] A figure struck by a Class A missile or thrown weapon will have his Agility lowered until the weapon is removed.
21. UNARMED COMBAT
22. MULTIHEX MONSTERS
23. MOUNTED COMBAT
24. INFECTION
VI. MAGIC

25. DEFINITION OF MAGICAL TERMS
26. HOW MAGIC WORKS
27. HOW TO CAST SPELLS
[27.1] It costs 1 Fatigue Point to cast a General Knowledge Spell and 2 Fatigue Points to cast a Special Knowledge Spell.
[27.2] A magic user may not cast a spell unless he has sufficient Fatigue Points to pay the cost of casting the spell.
[27.3] A character always expends the necessary Fatigue Points to cast a spell whether the spell is effective or not.
[27.4] There is no Fatigue Cost to prepare a spell.
[27.5] A spell must be used immediately upon being prepared or it is dissipated and the preparation must be repeated before it can be used.
[27.6] A character must remain immobile and may engage in no other activity while preparing or casting a spell.
[27.7] A character’s chances of effectively casting a spell may be increased or decreased by a variety
of factors.
7.8] A character must spend one full minute to prepare a spell and loose it during the Adventure Sequence and a lesser amount of time to prepare and loose the spell during the Tactical Procedure.
[27.9] There is always a chance that a character can successfully resist a spell even after the spell has successfully impacted on the character.
28. THE EFFECTS OF SPELLS
[28.1] In some cases, it will be necessary to make a Damage Check as a result of a successful spell cast.
[28.2] The casting character’s player determines what effect a multiplication of a spell’s power will have on the spell.
[28.3] A character may not attempt to cast a spell at a target that is not within a range in hopes of achieving a double or triple effect.
[28.4] The description of each spell lists its specific effects, range, duration and other appropriate material.
Each spell is fully described under the College to which it belongs. The following information is included.
Range: The maximum radius in feet within which the caster can make the spell take effect.
Duration: The maximum length of time in minutes, hours, or days that the spell remains in effect.
Experience: The multiple used in conjunction with the rank to be achieved to determine the cost of increasing a character’s Rank with a particular spell (see 87.4).
Base Chance: The basic percentage chance of causing the spell to take effect on a particular object or person within a circumscribed area. Resistance: The conditions under that the workings of the spell can be resisted by a being subject to its effects.
Effects: The general purpose and consequences of the spell. Includes potential damage as well as special effects.
29. RESTRICTIONS ON MAGIC
[29.1] A character may never prepare a spell or engage in ritual magic while in physical contact with cold iron.
[29.2] A character must have the freedom to make the necessary gestures and sounds in order to cast a spell or perform a ritual.
[29.3] A character cannot employ a type of magic or a spell or ritual with which he is not familiar.
[29.4] A character cannot perform a spell or ritual without the necessary equipment or working materials where such are required in the description of the spell or ritual.
[29.5] A character cannot cast a spell or execute a ritual if his concentration is broken.
30. BACKFIRE FROM SPELLS AND RITUALS
[30.1] Backfire Table
[30.2] All backfire effects are cumulative.
[30.3] It may be impossible to apply a specific backfire effect to certain characters or spells.
[30.4] The exact effects of specific backfire results are subject to the GM’s interpretation.
[30.5] When a backfire leads to a character being required to lose more Fatigue than he has available,
the excess Fatigue Points are removed from Endurance instead.
31. COUNTERSPELLS AND RESISTING SPELLS
[31.1] A character who is conscious and unstunned may make a Resistance Check to determine if he successfully avoids the effects of a spell.
[31.2] A character may choose to Actively resist a particular spell by stating his intention to do so, but may do nothing else during the time he is Actively resisting.
[31.3] A character’s Magic resistance will be affected by whether or not he is under the protection of a counterspell.
[31.4] The following modifications affect a character’s Magic Resistance by the numbers shown:
32. SPECIAL MAGICAL PREPARATIONS
[32.1] A character may increase his chance of successfully casting a spell by engaging in Ritual Spell Preparation.
[32.2] A character may increase his Magic Resistance by 5 and his Magical Aptitude by 1 for each hour spent in Ritual Purification.
[32.3] A character may store the power of a spell in an object in his possession by employing an Investment Ritual.
[32.4] A character may employ Ritual Magic to cast a Ward over an area which he occupies or is near.
33. INCORPORATING MAGIC INTO COMBAT
[33.1] A character can Actively resist a spell during combat by implementing an Evade action.
[33.2] A character cannot cast or actively resist a spell while engaged in Close Combat.
[33.3] The Cast Chance of a spell is affected only by the modifiers listed in 27.7 and by those modifiers listed for each College individually.

34. THE COLLEGES OF MAGIC
Magic is divided into 12 Colleges representing specific types of magic. The 12 Colleges are divided into three Branches of Magic. These Branches, and the Colleges encompassed by each, are listed below:

The Thaumaturgies:
The College of Ensorcelments and Enchantments
The College of Sorceries of the Mind
The College of Illusions
The College of Naming Incantations

The Elementals:
The College of Air Magics
The College of Water Magics
The College of Fire Magics
The College of Earth Magics
The College of Celestial Magics

The Entities:
The College of Black Magics
The College of Necromantic Conjurations
The College of Greater Summonings

[34.1] A character’s Magic Resistance is affected by the Branch of Magic of which he is a practitioner.
[34.2] Each College of Magic has its own individual requirements which must be met before a character of that College can employ any of the powers of spells of his College.
[34.3] The Adepts of a College are subject to certain modifications to their ability to successfully cast spells.
[34.4] The spells and powers available
to practitioners of each College are broken down into General Knowledge and Specialized Knowledge.
[34.5] A character may only employ the powers and spells of one College.
[34.6] A character is limited in the number of spells and rituals of lower rank that he may know.
[34.7] A character may not enter any College of Magic except the College of Naming Incantations unless he has the Magical Aptitude to account for mastery of the General Knowledge spells and rituals of that College.
[34.8] The talents, spells, and rituals of all Colleges are numbered and coded for easy identification.
All magic powers are coded as follows:
T=Talent Magic; G=General Spell; S=Special Spell; R=Special Knowledge Ritual; Q=General Knowledge Ritual. All talents are a form of General Knowledge. Talents, rituals, and spells are numbered within their code.
All counterspells are coded CS followed by the number of the section in which their College is described, and a G or S (for General or Special Knowledge). Thus, the General Knowledge counterspell of the College of Air Magics would be coded CS40G by anyone wishing to use this shorthand method (which is especially useful on Character Record Sheets).
All forms of Special Magical Preparation are coded by reference to their case number (32.1, 32.2, 32.3, or 32.4).
35. MAGIC CONVENTIONS

36. THE COLLEGE OF ENSORCELMENTS AND ENCHANTMENTS
This College is concerned with general magic, but especially with charming and enchanting individuals and objects.
[36.1] Adepts of the College of Ensorcelments and Enchantments may practice their arts without restriction.
[36.2] There are no modifiers to the Base Chance of performing any talent, spell, or ritual of the College except as listed in 27.7 or under the descriptions of the specific spells, talents, and rituals of the College.

37. THE COLLEGE OF
SORCERIES OF THE MIND
The College of Sorceries of the Mind is concerned with the manipulation of the mental powers of sentient beings.
[37.1] Adepts of the College of Sorceries of the Mind may practice their arts without restriction.
[37.2] The following numbers are added to the Base Chance of performing any talent, spell, or ritual of the College of Sorceries of the Mind.

38. THE COLLEGE OF ILLUSIONS
[38.1] Adepts of the College of Illusions may practice their arts without restriction.
[38.2] The following numbers are added to the Base Chance of performing any talent, spell or ritual of the College of Illusions:

39. THE COLLEGE OF NAMING INCANTATIONS
[39.1] There are no special requirements for using the Naming Incantations.
[39.2] The following numbers are added to the Base Chance of performing any talent, spell or ritual of the College of Naming Incantations:

40. THE COLLEGE OF AIR MAGICS
The College of Air Magics concerns the shaping of the powers of the element of air.
[40.1] Adepts of the College of Air Magics may only practice their arts if they are in contact with air.
They may never practice air magic while underwater or in a vacuum. They may never summon creatures of the air into an environment where avians could not survive.
[40.2] The following numbers are added to the Base Chance of performing any talent, spell, or ritual of the College of Air Magics.

41. THE COLLEGE
OF WATER MAGICS
The College of Water Magics is concerned with the shaping of the powers in the element of water.
[41.1] Adepts of the College of Water Magics may only practice their arts if they are in contact with or near water.
They may never practice their arts in a vacuum or a totally waterless place. They may not summon water-dwelling creatures into an area that does not contain a body of water large enough for the water-dwelling creature to immerse itself totally. They may use their magic while on land (in a non-arid area) but suffer some diminution in their abilities.
[41.2] The following numbers are added to the Base Chance of performing any talent, spell or ritual of the College of the Water Magics:

42. THE COLLEGE OF FIRE MAGICS
The College of Fire Magics is concerned exclusively with shaping the element of Fire.
[42.1] Adepts of the College of Fire Magics may only practice their arts in an area where it is possible for fire to exist.
They may not practice fire magic underwater or in a vacuum, for example.
[42.2] The following numbers are added to the Base Chance of performing any talent, spell or ritual of the College of Fire Magics:

43. THE COLLEGE OF EARTH MAGICS
The College of Earth Magics is concerned with the shaping of the powers of the earth itself and of those entities and things that are rooted in the earth or in contact with it.
[43.1] Practitioners of the College of Earth Magics must always be in contact with the earth to perform magic of this College.
[43.2] The following numbers are added to the Base Chance of performing any talent, spell or ritual of the College of Earth Magics:

44. THE COLLEGE OF CELESTIAL MAGICS
The College of Celestial Magics is concerned with the practice of those magic arts having to do with shadow, night, and stars. There are three distinct divisions of the College of Celestial Magics.
[44.1] Adepts of the College of Celestial Magics may practice their arts without restriction.
[44.2] The Base Chance of performing any talent, spell or ritual of the College of Celestial Magics is modified by the addition of the following numbers:

45. THE COLLEGE OF NECROMANTIC CONJURATIONS
The College of Necromantic Conjurations is concerned with the processes of life, death, decay, and putrefication.
[45.1] Adepts of the College of Necromantic Conjurations may practice their arts without restriction.
[45.2] The Base Chance of performing any talent, spell, or ritual of the College of Necromantic Conjurations is modified by the addition of the following numbers:

46. THE COLLEGE OF BLACK MAGICS
The College of Black Magics is organized somewhat differently from other Colleges in that its knowledge is available only to those who make various pacts with the Powers of Darkness.
[46.1] Adepts of the College of Black Magic may only practice those talents, skills and rituals permitted them by the Pact they have made.
[46.2] The Base Chance of performing any talent, spell or ritual of this College is modified by the addition of the following numbers:

47. THE COLLEGE OF GREATER SUMMONINGS
The College of Greater Summonings is concerned exclusively with the summoning and controlling of entities from other dimensions. All such summonings and associated magical procedures are Ritual Magic.
[47.1] Members of the College of Greater Summonings must meet requirements of time, place equipment, knowledge, and circumstance in order to perform their College’s magic.
[47.2] The following numbers are added to the Base Chance of successfully performing a ritual of the College of Greater Summoning:

VII. SKILLS
48. ACQUIRING AND USING SKILLS
[48.1] Any skill may be acquired at Rank 0 at a variable cost of Experience Points and 8 weeks of game time (see 78.1).
[48.2] The method by which a character learns a skill affects the Experience Point cost to acquire that skill or to increase the character’s Rank.
[48.3] A character may attempt to employ a non-magical skill any number of times during a day.
[48.4] The use of a non-magical skill is rarely automatically successful.
[48.5] Very few of the abilities associated with the various skills are quasi-magical.
[48.6] A character must practice any skill he acquires or risk a decrease in Rank.
49. SPECIAL SKILLS: SPOKEN AND WRITTEN LANGUAGES
[49.1] The ability to speak a language and the ability to read and write in that language are separate skills.
[49.2] If a character’s Rank in speaking a language is greater than their Rank in reading and writing that language, the character expends one-half the necessary Experience Points to acquire or improve the latter.
[49.3] The ease with which a character can engage in conversation in a particular language is indicated by their Rank in it.
[49.4] A character’s facility for reading or writing in a language is determined by their Rank in that skill.
[49.5] The extent of a character’s vocabulary is indicated by the highest Rank they have achieved in one of the language skills.
[49.6] If a character begins with the ability to speak or read and write in a language, their Rank in that skill is presumed to be 8.
50. ALCHEMIST
[50.1] An alchemist gains the ability to analyze chemicals at Rank 0.
[50.2] An alchemist can injure himself while working with dangerous chemicals.
[50.3] An alchemist will be able to better perform their skill when using the proper equipment or when working in a laboratory.
[50.4] An alchemist must purchase the components necessary to manufacture each of their products.
[50.5] An alchemist can mix standard chemicals beginning at Rank 3, and may add one additional ability to their repertoire at Ranks 5, 7 and 9.
[50.6] The ability to mix standard chemicals allows the alchemist to produce mixtures which can prove useful on expeditions.
[50.7] Medicines and antidotes are used to cure a being suffering from either disease, fever or poison.
[50.8] Poisons cause damage when introduced into the blood stream of a being.
[50.9] Potions are created by an alchemist with the aid of either an Adept or a Healer.
51. ASSASSIN
[51.1] An assassin must be able to use the sap or the garrote at a minimum of Rank 1 before advancing past Rank 2.

[51.2] An assassin increases his chance of causing a Grievous Injury as his Rank increases.
[51.3] An assassin may gain information from a victim through torture.
[51.4] An assassin is trained to improve his memory.
[51.5] An assassin is able to buy poisons, distilled venom and acids at cost (i.e., no mark-up) from an alchemist.
[51.6] An assassin causes his target increased damage when attacking through a rear hexside in Melee Combat.
[51.7] An assassin increases his chance of knocking out (see 108.5) his target with a sap by 2 for each Rank he has achieved in the skill.
[51.8] An assassin increases his chance of performing any action involving stealth (see 507.3) by 2 per Rank he has achieved with the ability.
[51.9] An assassin must pay (500 + [100 x Rank] ) Silver Pennies per year for “hush money,” accouterments, and implements of destruction.
52. ASTROLOGER
[52.1] An astrologer may only try once to answer a particular question or to forecast the outcome of an event.
[52.2] The results of a reading will affect the pertinent course of events.
[52.3] An astrologer’s Rank determines how many beings he can directly affect with a single prediction.
[52.4] An astrologer may make (and possibly modify) a general prediction during a reading.
[52.5] An astrologer may seek an answer for up to a number of specific questions per month equal to his Rank.
[52.6] An astrologer may not make a general prediction or ask a specific question concerning only himself.
[52.7] An astrologer can determine the aspect of a being after observing him.
[52.8] An astrologer expends Fatigue points when practicing his art.
[52.9] An Astrologer must spend (250 + [200 x Rank] ) Silver Pennies per year for astrolabes, oculars, reference works, and the like.
53. BEAST MASTER
[53.1] The value of a beast master’s Willpower must be at least 15.
[53.2] A beast master may only train animals for his own personal use until he achieves Rank 5. He may domesticate animals at any Rank.
[53.3] A beast master acquires the ability to train one type of animal and/or monster at Ranks 0, 5 and 10.
[53.4] A beast master must spend (12 – Rank) months to train an animal or monster, or a like number of weeks to domesticate one.
[53.5] A trained animal or monster must make a loyalty check whenever it recognizes that its master is endangering it, or whenever its master commands an action that runs counter to its instincts.
[53.6] A domesticated creature must make a loyalty check if the circumstances described in Case 53.5 arise.
[53.7] A beast master who intimidates his creatures adds one to his Rank when calculating training or domestication time, but the GM adds 10 to any loyalty check dice-roll for one of his creatures.
[53.8] A beast master may train or domesticate as many creatures as his Rank at one time. All creatures being trained or domesticated concurrently must be of the same type.
[53.9] A beast master must pay 150 Silver Pennies a year for equipment, and must pay 100 Silver Pennies per creature trained and 25 Silver Pennies per creature domesticated during the year.
54. COURTESAN
[54.1] A courtesan must generate a value for his Physical Beauty Characteristic (see 43.5).
[54.2] A courtesan acquires one ability per Rank.
[54.3] A courtesan may attempt to seduce a being with whom the courtesan is sexually compatible.
[54.4] A courtesan’s fee for services is dependent upon Rank and gender.
[54.5] A courtesan’s social position has peculiar advantages and disadvantages.
[54.6] A courtesan must pay (250 + [350 x Rank] ) Silver Pennies per year for finery and the props of the trade.
55. HEALER
[55.1] The abilities which can be used and the Fatigue Points expended when a healer practices his art depend upon his Rank.
[55.2] A healer must “lay hands” (place his hands) on a being on whom he is to use any of his abilities but empathy. When he does so, he can automatically detect the surface emotions of the being. he is healing.
[55.3] A healer cures fevers and diseases, neutralizes poisons and grafts skin in much the same manner that medicines and antidotes do (see 50.7).
[55.4] A healer may soothe pain and prolong life.
[55.5] A healer can cure Endurance Points and transfer Fatigue Points.
[55.6] A healer may repair torn, damaged, or broken muscles, bones, tissues and organs.
[55.7] A healer can preserve the body of a dead being in the hopes of having him resurrected.
[55.8] A healer can regenerate every portion of a being’s body.
[55.9] A healer can manufacture certain potions in conjunction with an alchemist (see 50).
56. MECHANICIAN
[56.1] A mechanician’s progress in his skill is inhibited by a low Manual Dexterity value, and aided by a high value in that characteristic.
[56.2] A mechanician can build increasingly sophisticated traps as his Rank increases.
[56.3] A mechanician can construct a magical trap, in which an Adept can store a spell.
[56.4] A mechanician may construct a lock or a safe of up to his Rank.
[56.5] A mechanician may earn
(25 + [10 x Rank]) Silver Pennies per day for building or supervising the construction of domestic devices.
[56.6] The GM may, at his discretion, allow a mechanician character to construct devices of use on adventures
[56.7] A mechanician can remove his own trap, open his own lock or safe without disturbing or harming his device in (12-Rank) minutes.
[56.8] A mechanician must pay (150 + [150 x Rank]) Silver Pennies per year to supply himself with a tool kit, raw materials, and an area in which to work.
57. MERCHANT
[57.1] The merchant’s ability to buy and sell a particular item is dependent upon its type.
[57.2] A merchant can buy items at a cost cheaper than the asking price.
[57.3] A merchant may mark up the price of an uncommon or rare item.
[57.4] A merchant can assay an item to determine its exact worth.
[57.5] A merchant character may use their skill to affect transactions involving up to (250 – [50 x Rank Squared] ) Silver Pennies per month, or a single transaction of any amount.
[57.6] A merchant can specialize in a specific category of item assayal every time they achieve a positive Rank divisible by three.
[57.7] A merchant must spend (15 + [5 x Rank] ) Silver Pennies per week to keep up appearances, and (100 + [175 x Rank]) Silver Pennies per year to buy assayal reference works.
58. MILITARY SCIENTIST
[58.1] A military scientist can lead (15 + [Rank squared] + [4 x Willpower]) troops effectively in battle.
[58.2] A military scientist can rally beings with whom he has drilled or adventured to prevent them from fleeing battle.
[58.3] A military scientist can sometimes perceive the tactics employed by his enemy before they are put to use.
[58.4] A military scientist may add his Rank to the initiative die roll in combat.
[58.5] The player of a military scientist character may use more time to plan his character’s (and companions’) actions when engaged in combat on the Tactical Display.
[58.6] A military scientist can temporarily increase the Willpower value of the beings he leads.
[58.8] A military scientist must spend
(50 + [50 x Rank] ) Silver Pennies per year to supply himself with texts on strategy and tactics.
59. NAVIGATOR
[59.1] A navigator can determine all compass directions if he can view the stars.
[59.2] A navigator may always determine the compass direction of a Iandmark relative to his position.
[59.3] A navigator can read a map if he can relate his physical surroundings to the symbols on that map.
[59.4] A navigator can competently pilot a ship of up to (25 + [25 x Rank] ) feet in length.
[59.5] A navigator can consistently maintain a ship’s speed at (50 + [5 x Rank] )% of its optimum speed.
[59.6] A navigator can predict weather at sea with a ([Perception] + [5 x Rank] )% chance of accuracy.
[59.7] A navigator can sometimes recognize non-magical danger at sea before subjecting his ship to it.
[59.8] A navigator must spend (250 + [25 x Rank] ) Silver Pennies per year to maintain the best directional equipment and nautical charts he can use.
60. RANGER
[60.1] A ranger acquires a “bump” of direction as he increases his Rank.
[60.2] A ranger can sometimes recognize an ambush in a natural setting before he (or a fellow party member) blunders into it.
[60.3] A ranger can attempt to track the progress of land bound beings through certain types of terrain.
[60.4] A ranger can usually recognize the effect a particular plant or animal product will have upon a humanoid.
[60.5] A ranger can forage for curative plants in a woods habitat.
[60.6] A ranger can specialize in one particular environment.
[60.7] A ranger may increase the chance of a favorable reaction (see 40.2) when encountering an animal in the environment of his specialty.
61. SPY AND THIEF
[61.1] If a character’s Rank as a spy is greater than his Rank as a thief, the character expends one-half the necessary Experience Points to acquire or improve the latter skill.
[61.2] A spy or thief can pick locks or open safes with the aid of their tools.
[61.3] A spy or thief can attempt to detect traps and, should the spy or thief succeed, can try to remove them.
[61.4] A spy or thief can sometimes detect a secret or hidden aperture.
[61.5] A spy or thief can attempt to pick the pocket of another being without being detected.
[61.6] A spy or a thief will develop a photographic memory as they gain experience.
[61.7] A spy increases their chance of performing an activity involving stealth (see 83.3) by 2% per Rank they have achieved; a thief increases their chance to perform stealth-related action by 1% per Rank.
[61.8] A spy or thief acquires an ability unique to their skill.
[61.9] A spy or thief must spend (250 + [150 x Rank] ) Silver Pennies per year to maintain a proper set of thieving equipment.
62. TROUBADOUR
[62.1] A troubadour acquires one ability per Rank.
[62.2] A troubadour’s chance of successfully performing minor magic (see 42.2) is increased by 2 per Rank.
[62.3] If a troubadour is a mage of the College of Illusions (see 22.3), they add 1 to their modified chance to cast a spell for every Rank they achieve.
[62.4] When a troubadour uses his Perception value to gain information (see 42.3) about the customs or habits of humanoids, add 2 per Rank he has achieved to his success percentage.
[62.5] A troubadour can use disguise to appear of a different humanoid race, gender, or profession.
[62.6] A troubadour can use their bardic voice to charm, several beings at once.
[62.7] A troubadour must spend (50 + [100 x Rank) Silver Pennies per year to supply himself with the props necessary for his trade.

VIII.Monsters
63. ENCOUNTERING MONSTERS AND NON-PLAYER CHARACTERS
[63.1] Danger Table
[63.2] Encounter Table
64. REACTIONS TO ENCOUNTERS
[64.1] The Physical Beauty of a Monster (or lack thereof) may cause characters to react in unpredictable ways.
65. HOW TO READ THE MONSTER DESCRIPTIONS
66. Common Land Mammals
67. Avians
68. Aquatics
69. Lizards, Snakes, and Insects
70. Giants, Fairies, and Earth Dwellers
71. Fantastical Monsters
72. Creatures of Night and Shadow
73. Summonables
74. Undead
75. Dragons
76. Riding Animals

IX. ADVENTURE
77. PREPARATION FOR ADVENTURE
[77.1] The GM must outline the course of the adventure.
[77.2] The GM records the “vital statistics” of all non-player characters and monsters to be encountered.
[77.3] The GM maps the area in which the characters will adventure, drafting the plans for any structure which will be an integral part of the scenario.
[77.4] Before the adventure begins, the players must notify the GM of all changes in status for their characters.
78. GAME CONVENTIONS
[78.1] The time scale for a campaign should be either two or three game days to one real day.
[78.2] The GM adjusts the passage of time during an adventure to the level of activity.
[78.3] When combat occurs on the Tactical Display, there should be no lapses of time between player announcements of character intentions and resolution of them.
[78.4] Any player may, at the GM’s discretion, suspend the passage of time by requesting a clarification of a relevant point by the GM.
[78.5] A player may change the action he announces for his character to a Pass Action (only) up to five seconds after he either announces it or is interrupted by another player protesting his choice.
[78.6] A player may appeal a decision made by the GM which he feels to be arbitrarily or improperly resolved.
79. ORGANIZING A PARTY
[79.1] The players should elect one of their number to be the leader of the party.
[79.2] Before an adventure is begun, the player characters should agree to the division of spoils.
[79.3] A character may become member in good standing of the Adventurers’ Guild by tithing 5% of all monetary gains to the Guild, or a minimum of 200 Silver Pennies per annum.
[79.4] The standard Adventurers’ Guild contract requires as equitable a distribution of treasure as is possible amongst the free-beings in the party.
[79.5] An arbitrator of the Adventurers’ Guild may place a “true speech” compulsion upon a being present at an arbitration session.
80. THE ADVENTURE SEQUENCE
[80.1] The real time allotted to the players to discuss the actions of their characters depends upon the current stage.
[80.2] One side in a combat may gain a free Pulse of attacks if it surprises the other.
[80.3] The Chase Stage applies whenever the player characters conduct an extensive search of a non-deserted area.
81. MONETARY MATTERS
[81.1] The value of a coin is determined by its weight and metal of which it is made.
[81.2] The Adventurer’s Guild will bank money and/or valuables At a fee of 2 Silver Pennies per 500 ounces per month.
[81.3] The Basic Goods Cost List is an anthology of the prices and weights of common items likely to be used by adventurers.
82. FATIGUE LOSS AND RECOVERY
[82.1] The rate at which a character loses Fatigue Points is determined by how tiring his main activity for each hour is.
[82.2] A character is limited in the weight he can bear; if he engages in exercise, he may become fatigued more quickly because of the objects he carries with him.
[82.3] The Fatigue Point loss for a character engaged in either or both magic or combat is not calculated using the provisions of rule 82.
[82.4] The Fatigue Point loss rates given in these rules assume that the character is in good health and is well fed.
[82.5] The Fatigue status of a character need be calculated only before he enters into combat or wishes to perform magic or, if he does neither, once for the entire day.
[82.6] An exhausted character is limited in the activities he may choose to do, and is worse in the performance of his abilities.
[82.7] A character may regain Fatigue Points by resting or eating a hot meal.
[82.8] The weight borne by a character may temporarily reduce a character’s Agility.
[82.9] Fatigue and Encumbrance Chart
83. ADVENTURE ACTIONS
[83.1] An adventurer is able to perform actions necessary to survival in his profession in an efficient manner.
[83.2] An adventurer will use horsemanship to direct animals which he rides.
84. CONSEQUENCES
[84.1] All spoils and rituals given in a listing in this section can be used by Adepts of any college.
[84.2] A geas is a compulsion laid upon a being.
[83.3] An adventurer can use stealth to move as soundlessly and unobtrusively as possible.
[83.4] During the course of his adventures, an adventurer will need to travel rapidly overland.
84. CONSEQUENCES
[84.1] All spoils and rituals given in a listing in this section can be used by Adepts of any college.
[84.2] A geas is a compulsion laid upon a being.
[84.3] A minor curse causes its victim to suffer from a non-fatal malediction.
[84.4] A major curse is an insidious and deadly spell.
[84.5] A Remove Curse Ritual is a Special Knowledge ritual that can sometimes save a being from the consequences of a major or minor curse.
85. RECUPERATION AND UPKEEP
[85.1] The rate at which Endurance Points are recovered depends on how active the injured being is.
[85.2] Injuries which are not quantified as Endurance Point losses (e.g., hamstrung muscles) heal at the same rate as they do in this world.
[85.3] A character must spend money between adventures on his upkeep.
86. HOW EXPERIENCE IS GAINED
[86.1] The GM should make one set of Experience Point awards for every five hours of effective play during one session.
[86.2] The base Experience Point award for a character at the conclusion of an adventure depends upon the character’s proficiency and the success or failure of the common mission.
[86.3] The base Experience Point award can be increased or decreased by increments of 10% for special circumstances.
[86.4] A character can gain Experience Points for practicing his abilities while not on an adventure.
87. HOW EXPERIENCE IS USED
[87.1] Experience Points costs may be modified by a character’s race (see 6), but the time required to gain Rank is invariable.
[87.2] The value of a characteristic may be increased immediately by the expenditure of the proper amount of Experience Points.
[87.3] A character must spend Experience Points, time and money to improve his Rank with a weapon.
[87.4] A character must spend money and time to learn a spell or ritual, and Experience Points and time to increase his Rank with it.
[87.5] A character must spend Experience Points, time and perhaps money to increase his Rank with a skill. (See 8.6 and 48 on how skills are acquired.)
[87.6] The abilities described in the Adventure rules are improved in a manner similar to the abilities in other rules.
[87.7] The requirements noted above for the advancement of skills are ultimately up to the discretion of the GM.

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