Posts Tagged ‘indiegogo’

Blog name change

March 18, 2012

This blog has a new name: Antherwyck House Games. It’s the same blog, fundamentally; all the old posts are still here, and it will continue to be largely about DragonQuest and about indie games. But it is now going to be linked from the new website (coming soon), and is going to become an official part of Antherwyck House. Announcements and discussions of new projects will be posted here.

We’re never going to be a high volume publisher; this is a side-line for us. But, after the fundraiser for the Wilderness adventure, it became clear that there was still an audience for DragonQuest materials, even though it’s been nearly a quarter century since anything was last published. We’re looking to become the source for that small audience.

We’re plotting a release schedule for our first year. The present plan is to have one new title per quarter, and we’ll see how that works out.

We may also get more heavily involved in the development of a retro-clone for DragonQuest. Retro-clones are re-written rules that are compatible with an existing game. The core concepts of the game remain, but they are written in new language, so that they do not fall afoul of copyright law. A lot of old-school games are getting this treatment. Having a free retro-clone of DragonQuest would make it easier for new players to discover the game and try it out.


Connecting Wilderness and Alusia

February 25, 2012

There was a question raised on the IndieGoGo page for the Wilderness project, wondering if the adventure “is taking place on Alusia or not. Does anybody know?”

Since the adventure will include its own map (the new quarter-map that Stephen Peto is working on) it is not going to be located on the Frontiers of Alusia map (though I expect an enterprising GM who really wants to transpose it there may find a way to do that). 

The better question would be if it will coordinate with Frontiers of Alusia at all. My initial thought in putting it together was just that I was creating a new map; I meant it to be a completely separate setting. However, I’ve ended up with something that might coordinate with the Frontiers of Alusia rather well, for some people.

This map is one possibility. The Frontiers of Alusia are to the south. The Western extents of the Confederated Baronies (mentioned in the Frontiers of Alusia) would occupy the area of the black rectangle in the middle (which would be another Alusia-sized map. What I’ve written about it (draft) for the adventure is this: “The region of the map can be related to Alusia with another map of similar size to the Alusia map covering the majority of the land of the Confederated Baronies north of the Frontiers of Alusia. For a comparison to Earth, that’s approximately similar to having Carzala as Bilbao, Spain and Cape Bage as Saint-Nazaire/Nantes, France, or Los Angeles to San Francisco for a west coast cognate in the US.”

There are probably many campaigns that have already developed their own extensions from the Frontiers of Alusia, and this extension may not readily fit into how their campaign has developed the lands beyond Alusia.

I haven’t gotten a lot of strong feedback one way or the other about having a connection with Alusia. I’m curious if those of you who are using Alusia have strong thoughts one way or the other. Do you think this is a useful enhancement to the existing setting, or is this stomping all over sacred memory, and Alusia should be the beginning and end of it all?

The artist for Wilderness

February 3, 2012

Had an exchange of emails with Nate Marcel, the artist who I’ve been in touch with about doing some illustrations for the Wilderness project. He’s posted a shout-out about the project on his blog, so I’m taking the occasion to also link to his blog.

Feedback from the adventure supporters about his work has been positive, too. This image (which I’ve linked to his online sketchbook) is very reminiscent of the illustrations by John Garcia from the original DragonQuest rulebook. It’s not the same style, but it has a similar character. (Garcia, unfortunately, died a few years ago). I’ve also been using this particular image as a placeholder/test image as I’ve been working on setting up the page layout. If you’re a DQ player, I think you’ll agree there’s something about this kind of black and white illustration that just seems right for DQ. I think he was a serendipitous find.

It’s a small job for him, but he’s been very receptive to working on a small scale gaming project and recognizing we don’t have a big budget. I’m looking forward to working with him on this.

Making a Fundraiser Work

February 2, 2012

There is a good discussion about many of the finer points of setting up a project with IndieGoGo or Kickstarter on; it’ll probably spill past this point as the discussion continues, but I just came in on the thread a couple pages back, so this will put you in the middle of the part I’ve been in on.

I wanted to repeat my comments here that I posted there (as well as keep an anchor to go back later):

In response to the suggestion from another commenter that you should open your project to non-domestic supporters, I completely agree.  For DragonQuest, which has a big international audience, being readily accessible outside the US was important, and it’s paid off. More than a third of the contributions (in total dollar value) to the Wilderness project to date are from outside the US, coming from 3 different countries, so far.

I also understand that Kickstarter is less easy for non-US supporters, which is one of the reasons I went with IndieGoGo, though it sounds like IndieGoGo has some other drawbacks.

It was also suggested that you have separate domestic and international perks. Mine won’t be too expensive to ship, and I think international shipping looks to be less of a premium than what I originally thought it might be. If you have a strong international appeal and the perk levels warrant it, you might consider eating or splitting the international shipping costs, to make it more appealing. I haven’t officially announced it, yet, but I’m contemplating splitting the international shipping upcharge with my supporters.

The Wilderness in Microscope

December 23, 2011

I’m thinking about running an online Microscope game to set some of the backstory and history for the “Wilderness of A—”

I’ve been interested in Microscope since Thor pointed it out to me a few months ago. I bought a copy of it, but I haven’t had a chance to try playing it yet.

It struck me, a couple days ago, that I might be able to do an online Microscope game with specific focus on the backstory for the adventure I’m working on. So, I’m going to invite all the current contributors to participate in a world-building game.

I’m not sure if this will work well, or not, but in any case, I think it will help generate some ideas, even if I end up changing and revising things significantly from the game as it plays out. And it will be a chance to play a game of Microscope, as well. I’ll email the contributors about this shortly. If you’d like to get in on this, sign up as a contributor to the “Wilderness” fundraiser.

My previous posts on: Microscope|More Microscope

Microscope site

Working Title: Wilderness

November 28, 2011

I’m getting ready to start the adventure fundraiser project. The working title for the adventure is Wilderness. Naming rights are open to discussion and/or sponsorship.

Right now, my plan is to start the campaign on December 1st and run it through the end of February. That’s a little longer than ideal, but I think it allows more time to reach people who might be interested in it and try to recruit them to contribute.

I’m planning to use IndieGoGo to handle the fundraising. This means a couple things for the project. Most importantly, unlike Kickstarter, all contributions are collected. If the project doesn’t reach its goal in Kickstarter, no one gets charged. But with IndieGoGo, if you pledge X dollars, you are charged X dollars immediately, and, after the fees are taken out, the rest goes to fund the project right away. I’ve also been given to understand that it is easier for non-US contributors to participate through IndieGoGo, as opposed to other crowd funding platforms.

The upside for this is that, as long as there is some contribution, the adventure is going to be produced. It may only be minimally funded, in which case, it’s going to be smaller in scale. But I’m going to take the advice of Mark Shocklee about setting a range of goals.

The base goal is probably going to be $750. For that, the project will be a minimum 16-page adventure. If support reaches $1500, it will be a minimum 32-page adventure.

There is also an opportunity to have an art component. If support reaches $3000, I will have a custom piece of cover art commissioned from Timothy Truman (the artist who did the cover art for Enchanted Wood; I’ve been in brief contact with him, and it looks like it would be possible to commission him for a piece). That might also end up being a separate crowd funding project, rather than rolling it into the adventure fundraiser. I’ve also contacted another artist to see about rates for some interior art. I was going to see about contacting John Garcia (who did many of the interior drawings for the DQ rulebook), but unfortunately he passed away a few years ago.

I’d like to have some art in the adventure even if we only raise a moderate amount of funds. So I will assign roughly 20% of the money raised to go toward illustrations and artwork. This will probably mean hiring younger, lesser-known artists for a pittance (and I am not happy at having to do that), but I am realistic about the money that will be available, and I hope that I will be able to find a couple people who might be willing to do some fun work for a fraction of what they would normally charge. The other option would be to find some existing art that would be appropriate that we might be able to license to use.

If you have any leads or ideas about the art side, let me know.