Making a 21st Century DragonQuest

June 13, 2019 by

There was some discussion on Twitter this weekend posing the question: “What clunker of an older game do you dream of pairing with a modern ruleset that you think would make the world shine?”

I misunderstood the question (Twitter does not encourage thoughtful reading), and I took it less as an A-plus-B question than as a question of an older rule system that could shine with a more modern revision. And, of course, my mind went directly to DragonQuest (though I certainly don’t think it’s a clunker, but it is lost in a mostly forgotten corner of the gaming world.

So what might a modern DQ look like? That’s the discussion I’d like to start having.

I’ve more or less set aside the Open Source DQ project, because I don’t think it would accomplish that much to re-write the game. And the Seagate Rules are a pretty comprehensive version of that for those who want something like that to work with. But a more thorough reworking of the system could potentially be more interesting, and a better project at this point. And a new version of DQ could be appealing to a new generation of players.

In my experience, newer players have had difficulty managing and tracking all the minute details of the game. And I would rather have a faster moving game that could still do all the things DQ does, with less of the calculation that generally slows things down. Making things a bit more streamlined, and paring back some of the detail that doesn’t contribite that much to the game to create a faster playing game that nevertheless retained much of the character (other than the accounting-level numbers) of the game.

Since the original game is percentile based, it would be comparatively easy to make a D10 version that was fairly cross-compatible with the parent. If your strike chance was 73 and the first digit rolled was a 4, you didn’t need the second digit. You could keep track of the character with percentages, but use a faster D10 system that simplified and speeded up actions during play.

Chris Klug at one point a few years ago was talking about adapting a d20/DQ ruleset that built on the ubiquity of D&D. I’m not sure that’s the best way to go. Speaking personally, one of the things that drew me to DQ was the more human level of the characters (even high-level heroes are comparatively vulnerable in DQ, versus the accumulated Hit Points in D&D). And the infinite range of characters based on skills and abilities, rather than a handfull of classes. D&D has done a lot since the version that was around when DQ came out, but I don’t think D&D is the direction to take a new variant for DQ.

And because of the modular nature of the DQ rules, it would be possible to swap in new combat rules, for example, but keep the magic and skills as they are. Or other combinations short of full conversion would also be possible.

But this kind of project is a different kind of thing than what I’ve been discussing in the past; the formatting and coordination and organization is secondary to the general approach to the major game systems.  I’ll have some preliminary ideas about these in the next couple weeks.

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Thoughts About Commerce (Buy Rodger a Coffee)

June 8, 2019 by

This is tangential (but not unrelated) to the discussion I’ve seen bits of on various platforms over the question of selling products versus just giving them away for free. I don’t believe it’s a simple black-or-white issue, and I certainly don’t have the answer to the question.

{And after writing this, but before it posted, I was listening to the Thought Eater podcast (Ep. #65) where, in the last segment, Jeremy discusses the same question with some good points and a perspective I think is worth pointing you at. And the post that got Jeremy going was from Tales of the Grotesque and Dungeonesque.  I think they’re both worth your time.}

I’ve put stuff online – that other people might consider a finished product – that I’ve given away for free, in that perspective. Every blog post is time and effort spent without payment.

I’ve put things on DriveThruRPG to sell them.  As far as I know, I’m the only publisher for DragonQuest-related products.  It’s  a specialty niche, and I’m not getting rich (or even breaking even) from it.  But for the time and effort that goes in to those products, I think it’s reasonable to ask people to pay for those.  We’re old-school enough that we’re still somewhat print-focused, even though we also sell a lot of things just as PDFs.  And print materials are always going to have a cost associated with them, so we sort of stumbled into the market that way.

I never really rolled out a Patreon page, and given what happened with that platform, I’m pretty glad now that I didn’t. I’m not interested in being a part of that system that doesn’t really want to work with me.

And the whole idea of asking for money for the work that I do is still more than a little off-putting.  This whole article started more than a year ago, and sat in the drafts folder because I wasn’t ready to address the topic.  We’re acculturated to be uncomfortable about money, and I think that’s in the subtext of what’s in the social media discussion I referenced above.  {Again, from Thought Eater: the idea that everything needs to be evaluated through the lens of commerce is just wrong. There’s nothing wrong with making things available for free.  And sales is a metric of how good you are at selling, not of how good your thing is.}

There are a host of different tip jar/buy a coffee/send a contribution systems available to support creative work that people are making available. I’ve seen a couple people using different versions of these, and now, I have decided to give one of these a try and added a link to Buy Me A Coffee for tips and contributions (near the top of the column at the right).  So, if you find the things I’ve been producing to be worth a little support, you could do that here:

https://buymeacoff.ee/AntherwyckDQ

There are two main categories of things I’m working on: RPG maps, and adventures and materials for DragonQuest.  If we’re able to raise another $150 or so from sales and contributions, my plan is to get some additional software to use for further project production.

Since it’s a new thing, I’m not sure yet how much I can do with rewards and benefits for those who have contributed.  If you would be interested in being a supporter, let me know what kinds of things between those two categories you would be most interested in seeing as a premium for your contributions.  I should be able to do small maps on a somewhat more regular basis, so if you’d like to make some suggestions for one of those, that’s one option.

Quick Hits – June 2019

June 6, 2019 by

d8obqrtw4aed6f8

So now it’s June; what’s new?

Two things I want to start spending some mental cycles on in the coming few weeks are: 1) getting the current Exquisite Corpse project back underway, and finding new contributors to help finish that out; and 2) starting a new DragonQuest adventure. I have a couple ideas kicking around in that regard, and it would be great to discuss those with folks and see what would really resonate for the community, but everything is so dissipated now that it’s hard to muster any discussion about DQ things. If you’re a DQ fan, you can have an outsized influence on things by joining the discussion or spreading the word.

I also have another publication credit: my building plans are among the maps and graphics in the Cthulhu Hack adventure “Mother’s Love” This is a more embellished version than what was used in the PDF I saw earlier, but I think this version will make it into things eventually.

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As we posted last month, the Planetary Display Logbook is now live on DriveThruRPG. And, to provoke some ideas and show how it might work, we created a Planetary Display for the Moon (using a false color image of the Moon representing relative altitude). That’s not the source image, above; that’s another lunar image I came across a few days ago, and I’m thinking about how I might be able to do something using that.

Image from @areasvellas on Twitter –

Planetary map. 1971-1998 NASA “This Planetary Map shows the moon’s dark side, with colors correlating to geological materials and phenomena. It is one of a series produced in partnership with NASA between 1971 and 1998”.

The print version of the Planetary Display Log should be coming along shortly. If it was possible to do this with a non-glossy cover, so that you could write or draw on the cover, as well, we’d be all set. I’m still trying to work out the best way to do something for that, though. Probably just need to get a proof copy and see how it looks.

On the IRL side of things, I have started a new job at a new company.  It’s cutting down my commute and my away-from-home time considerably, and I’ve also had the opportunity to do a couple quick maps I’ve been posting on Twitter and Mastodon. (Insert lament for the loss of G+ here…)

While there’s a bit more time available in my day, there’s also the whole process of ramping up for the new job, so progress on other things hasn’t been as rapid as I would like.

Comments and feedback are always welcome. I haven’t been as good as I want in responding to other things I’ve read and seen, but I’m still trying to engage more.

Planetary Logbook – MOON

June 2, 2019 by

nB Capture

To show how the Planetary Display Logbook would work, I’ve taken a set of 6 false color images of the moon from the LRO, where color represents altitude – north and south polar views, nearside and farside faces, and east and west sides.  I’ve used those to fill out the 32 panels of a Planetary Display Logbook, so there’s a completed planetary display to show how it could work.

n6 CaptureThis will probably eventually be available from DriveThruRPG one way or another, but for now it’s just an alpha draft as we work it all out.  If you’ve bought the Logbook from us already and you’d like to get a copy, contact us, and we’ll get it to you one way or another.

Working from a source like that, there are parts of the image that are cut out.  So, if you put all the pieces together, you’d still have breaks between the sections.  Because the logbook is an abstraction, there are things that get missed or that get lost in translation from the flat form (which is already an abstraction) to the facets of the truncated icosahedron. I’m sure there are cartographic tools and methods that would do a better translation, but for gaming purposes, I think this is going to be good enough.

n1 CaptureYou can see the differences between the two coordinate systems, especially in the near polar sections (like Region 1n).  The arcing lines from the original NASA maps don’t line up with the straight lines from the Planetary Display Log, but you can see how the distortions occur between the source and the display format and how the two different kinds of display are marking the information in the map.

The image quality and resolution of the source imagery is a bigger issue for me right now.  These are large-ish images, but since they are using just a segment of the image for each page, they get somewhat pixelated when just a portion is used for a page.

With this getting worked out, we’ll probably have some version of this included with the Zvezda adventure, when that comes out.  So consider this another teaser on that front, as well.


The “moon cube” of the six source images:

moon cube

Planetary Logbook is live

May 25, 2019 by

We’ve just launched the latest DriveThruRPG product from Antherwyck House Games: the Planetary Display Logbook.

PlanetaryDisplayLogbook-Cover

This takes our Planetary Display and turns it into a 40 page PDF with pages for mapping a planet (or other spherical surface) with a set of 32 hexagons and pentagons (like a soccer ball/football).  Each page is for one of these sections, and additional information about the region can be collected on the page, as well.

RegionEn-sample

Since it’s a PDF, you can print as many copies as you need for an entire campaign.

Eventually, we’ll have a printed version of the Logbook also available from DriveThruRPG.  Those will probably be comparatively cheap, since they will be for a single planet, instead of being able to print as many as you want.

We’re running the Planetary Display Logbook with an introductory discount, but, as a reader of this blog, we’re offering a further discount to you.  Get the Planetary Display Logbook PDF for only $7.95 with the discount code 9fcfe5f85f (good only through the end of June).

If you are interested in licensing this format for your game system or in having custom versions made, get in touch with us.  We’re also hoping that early buyers will offer us feedback on how we might make the Logbook even better.

Quick Hits – What’s New for April 2019

April 8, 2019 by

It’s hard to be throwaway with a blog post, but that’s what we need in the post-G+ world.  A kind of shorter, less authored thing, more like the kinds of things we would’ve posted in groups.

Moonbase – Planetary Display – Podcasts – Miscellany

Working on the Moon Station Zvezda project.  I’ve got a preliminary mockup of the format I’d like to use for it, and I think it’s going to be a good looking piece. In an ideal world, we’d have it ready on or around the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing in July.  That may or may not happen, but we’re trying.

I got the Planetary Log Book almost completed this weekend.  Letting it percolate for a couple days, and waiting for some outside feedback, but it could be ready pretty soon.  My inclination is to make the PDF a bit more expensive (around $10), since that is actually going to be the useful version where you can print out your own planet books one after another as you need ’em.  The print version (from DriveThru) should be comparatively cheap (possibly around $3 – $4 each), and I’d like to be able to offer batch discounts (maybe 6 for $20 or something like that; maybe a package deal with a few print copies plus the PDF).  I’d like to get a couple outside reviewers to look it over and offer some feedback on the present version.

Recent listening:

Has anyone else used someone as a hired social-media person, and how did that work out?  We don’t do a particularly great job with keeping Antherwyck House out there, and I think it would be useful to find someone who could do a few things for us on various platforms.

 

 

Soundtrack for Space: 1969

March 16, 2019 by

I think we’re going to stick with ‘Moon Station Zvezda’ as the title for the space game project.  But Thor mentioned an alternate title of Space: 1969, and that’s very, very good, as well.

However, my main question here is to solicit appropriate tunes for a soundtrack for a space-based game set in the early 70s.  What kind of things would you recommend?

The scenario is located (in the current iteration of the timeline) in 1973, but things into the mid 70s are probably okay, since it is an alternate timeline.  And it doesn’t have to be 100-percent of the time period, if there’s something more recent that nonetheless evokes the sense of the era.

Split-level cavern

March 7, 2019 by

overall Capture
Another cave hex map with some up-and-down in order to try to show two levels overlaid on each other.  It’s a twisty, two-level overlay with four openings to lower levels, and the large opening in the top-right rooms is like a balcony overlooking onto a larger room underneath (which could yield some interesting complexity in a combat situation).

The green area at the far right is a pool.  There’s a ledge on the far side, across the water.  There’s also a tunnel opening underwater that connects to a passage back to the central vertical shaft.

oCapture
At a closer level of zoom, the shading indicating areas underneath other areas. When the image is zoomed out, though, it just appears as a shade, though it’s still probably adequately functional.  The map wasn’t designed to be colored, but experimenting with it worked well enough that I decided that this should be the version to post.

This seems like something that would be found in a jungle setting.  I imagine it with the entry steps, although wide, almost entirely hidden by vines and overgrowth.  But, of course, you can set it wherever suits.

As usual, feel free to use for any non-commercial purpose, or contact me if you’d like to use this on a commercial project.

Ruvifeln’s Cavern Rooms

March 6, 2019 by

It’s been too long since I’ve had any kind of map to post, let alone one that’s a hex map.  But here’s a last one to be automatically cross-posted to G+ (and a reminder that you can follow this blog, or find me on other platforms if you’re interested in staying in touch and seeing more).

Portions of this cavern complex have been walled off to create several rooms.  The primary corridor for the area is the one running left-to-right at the top of the map (in this orientation).  An area of comparative isolation has been closed off with walls and doors.  There are two paths leading off to additional parts (at the bottom and at lower left) that could lead to other areas controlled by this access point.

As usual, feel free to use for any non-commercial purpose, or contact me if you’d like to use this on a commercial project.

Preliminary Zvezda Rules

February 12, 2019 by

[ed note: Thor posted this on G+, and it’s been copied over here so it isn’t lost when G+ disintegrates.]

So I like the quiet around here and hope to get this done. Moon Base Zvezda is a historical fantasy where the space race went further and the cold war extends to the moon bases.

In Moon Base Zvesda it is assumed that all characters are fully trained, really smart, AND working for their government whether they know it or not. Hence all characters are made by assigning the numbers 1, 2, and 3 to being an Astronaut, an engineer, and a spy. Each Area of Knowledge gets one of the three numbers.

The resolution system is based on a simple idea. If the task at hand is more fitting of an Astronaut, roll a number of dice equal to the Astronaut area of knowledge. Ditto Engineer and spy. If any die scores higher that the target number you succeed.

For a one shot game I would set the target number at 4 and let the game ride. But if this game is going to have more legs there are a couple ways we could tweek the system.

There are three levers that can make this system more robust/realistic/complicated. The first is adjusting the target numbers, the second is giving some characters benefits through as yet unintroduced stats, and lastly by making the results vary depending on the number of successes.

Varying the difficulty has two benefits. It makes having more dice in an AOK to roll significantly better and it makes people at the table think that the world is more diverse. The down side of varying the difficulty is that it can feel arbitrary and offloads a certain amount of work into the GM.

Adding stat modifiers to the roll based on what your character is like makes the characters more different and makes some challenges more difficult than others. At the moment we do not have any stats but that can be changed.

Changing the number of successes needed greatly disadvantages characters with low AOKs, but I can imagine a version of the game where 1 or 2 successes make the player face hard choices about what they can accomplish. Breaking the door down or doing it quietly. That sort of thing. The GM should talk about these situational things when describing the situation.

I think any of these things can be implemented alone or in tandem. How far we want to go needs to be weighed against the usefulness and the amount of time till we have a completed game.

On top of that we can make the GM figure all of this out on the fly or make it so that we have to imagine all the possibilities.

Next Projects 2019

February 7, 2019 by

Just about 2 years ago, I posted a “Next Projects” post with some of the things that were in the works.  While I hadn’t planned on a recap, it seems like a good time to review those things, as well as some forward looking for what’s upcoming and in the works.  It’s also an invitation to follow the blog (I’m trying to use my RSS feed reader to follow other folks’ blogs) or to find other ways to stay in touch, especially with the coming end of G+.

Of the things posted before, a few are done; a few others are still in the works to one extent or another; some are available on DriveThruRPG if you want to get a copy for yourself.

Moon Station Zvezda – still on the list, and moved to the top because this summer is the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11.  So there’s some tie-in interest to be found, potentially.  It’s a fun idea to play with, graphically.

moonbase

The Moonbase map (above) and the Spaceship Dice Drop Table are a couple pieces that show some of the graphic style this may end up having.  The current shorthand description we’re using for it is a Lady Blackbird-style one-shot (though it’s certainly possible to do more in it if you like the setting).  The premise is an alternate-history post-60s space race world with more moon landings and moon presence among the superpowers, and thinking about some of the proposed alternative space programs as having gotten off the drawing boards.

DragonQuest adventures and products.  Gazetteer for the Wilderness of Ordurak, and Small, Untitled DQ Adventure (which became The Sentinel Chapel, and was a featured Deal of the Day earlier this year), are completed and available, as well as the public release of The Wilderness of Ordurak adventure.  Expanded Alusia was another idea, but that is more a back-burner thing at the moment.  But the recent unearthing and release of the DQ World Generation draft text has fired up some thoughts about other DQ projects.  Some of the things missing, but listed in the table of contents from DQ World Generation could be an intriguing followup to Poor Brendan’s Almanac.  And I’m pondering a couple of sequel ideas for the adventures I’ve previously written.

Ogunimata Cyberpunk adventure also prompted some map work, but is moving slowly.

Piranesi City Dungeon.  Also back-burnered at the moment.

Exquisite Corpse Dungeon is on the sixth iteration right now, although it has bogged down somewhat with the collapse of G+.  We need to find the best place to continue the discussion, and we’ll probably set up a separate hosting for it somewhere, as well.  Copies of completed previous ones are in the archives of the blog, here.

More maps, in general. This is still more hit-or-miss (and more often a miss) than I would like, but I keep posting the occasional thing from time to time.  With the resurgence of The Fantasy Trip, I think I’m going to try to do a few more hex-based maps.  I’ve had a couple I’ve done in the past that I’ve liked how they turned out, and it’s useful for both DQ and TFT.


Other new things:

Elfgame (placeholder name) – it’s just a germ of a game idea, but I think it has potential.  This would be an RPG where the world is inhabited by both humans and elves, and adventures deal with the intersections between the two.  Elves live (effectively) forever, so they are the constant in the game.  Humans’ lives are comparatively short, so any humans for an adventure are one-shot characters, and the next game session will take place in their grandchildrens’ time, or even further into the future.  Folklore and Shakespearean influences are the flavor this will aim to evoke.

Dark Days – a fantasy game aimed at a more Fafhrd/Grey Mouser kind of feel.  A recent post from Beloch Shrike aka Link Skywalker at Papers & Pencils titled “Magic Words Suck. Here’s Magic in the Moment.” seems like a good starting point for one branch of the magic system with the right kind of literary feel that this game calls for.

Links and resources – especially with the G+ wind-down, there are other scattered communities where people are landing, but having a blog or a site that is a good resource for people is a good way to engage and connect.  I want to start regularly tagging other blogs or sites that I’m trying to follow more often to stay in touch with gaming folks.  Some of it is going to be more linking and encouraging you (if you’ve read this far, you might give some consideration to my recommendation) to go check out some of these sites.  Maybe you’re also a kindred spirit, and you forge a new connection, too.

I also want to start building a directory of dungeon mappers as a general resource.  I can start right off the bat with a couple dozen folks who have participated in the Exquisite Corpse Dungeons.  This idea is inspired by a more general cartographers index someone (I now forget who or where) had put together.  I’ve done other things with the ECDs to bring dungeon mappers together, and so it’s not completely out of line for me to put together something like that.


That’s a comparatively lengthy post from me.  If there are things in here that intrigue you, I’m very interested in your feedback and comments.

A Correspondent Dungeon

February 7, 2019 by

Here’s a quick and dirty test of concept map. Haven’t posted any new maps in quite a while, but that doesn’t mean I’ve stopped making or thinking about them. Feels good to be doing this again.

I think the method used to create this map is fairly obvious; I think it probably needs more work to come up with a more practically useful result, but it works well enough as is to be worth sharing.

As usual, feel free to use for any non-commercial purpose, or contact me if you’d like to use this on a commercial project.

DQ World Generation

February 2, 2019 by
[EDIT: First link is now direct to file. But I encourage you to check out Phil’s article, as well.]

A draft copy of the World Generation supplement for DragonQuest (direct link) has been located and is now available.  If you had bet that you’d be getting a copy of previously unseen DragonQuest materials for the first time in 2019, collect your winnings at the door.  The rest of us are just going to enjoy having a chance to look this over.

WGcontent

Enormous thanks to Phil Wright, who had gotten a copy of it many years back (you can read his story on his site where he has the PDF) and who is hosting and sharing it:

https://dqmusings.blogspot.com/2019/02/the-unreleased-world-generation.html

Some parts from this index are missing in the final draft, but the pages have been OCRed and cleaned up, and it’s quite a manuscript.

Thanks, also, to Steve Jackson, the original author of the work, for allowing it to be shared publicly at this point.

I’ll have more to say about this once I’ve read the whole thing.

[I had a chance to start looking at this before Phil got his link up, so this began as an article saying it was coming soon, but I just got work from him that it’s now posted, so go download a copy and check it out yourself!]

A Text Description Exquisite Corpse Dungeon

January 6, 2019 by

During (and after) these Exquisite Corpse dungeons, people have asked about providing descriptions for the rooms.  There were different suggestions about how to add descriptions to the maps, but nothing  really seemed to fit.  So the Exquisite Corpse dungeons we’ve been mapping have just been graphical.

But those who have wanted to find descriptions for the dungeons should check out the “Tomb of the Exquisite Corpse” collaborative dungeon project being run by Kyle Latino.  It is a project to develop room descriptions and wandering monster descriptions for an eventual freely available document.

The “Tomb of the Exquisite Corpse” is a more modular project, and doesn’t have hooks or hints from one contributor’s piece to the next, like the shared connections from one section of the map to the next contributor.  But it is keeping most of the content hidden until the final reveal of the whole project.

It seems like a really intriguing complement to the Exquisite Corpse Dungeon maps, and anyone who is a fan of one should check out (and even consider participating in) the other.

Link: “Tomb of the Exquisite Corpse: A Collaborative Dungeon Project

A Banner Ad

January 5, 2019 by

ahg banner ad

I rather like this banner ad we’ve cooked up for DriveThruRPG.  We’ve accumulated a bit of capital with them to be able to run some ads, so we’ll see if more people find our collection with this.

Of course, I’m not the intended audience for this.  So this would be something where your feedback about this (whether or not you’re a likely buyer for any Antherwyck House Games titles) would be helpful.

Post- Deal of the Day Thoughts

January 3, 2019 by

Thanks to the folks who picked up a copy of “The Sentinel Chapel” as yesterday’s Deal of the Day at DriveThruRPG. It was good to get a few sales, and now it’s in the hands of a wider range of folks. Hopefully, a couple of them will give some feedback, and then, maybe, we’ll work on putting out a sequel to it (?)

No promises there, but it’s in the back of my mind.

I’m surprised at the uptake from Fantasy Trip (TFT) players, and I only started re-discovering the close connections between DQ and TFT over the break, when I put together the conversion page. But, with the recent new activity for TFT, this might be a useful synergy.

“Sentinel Chapel” Deal of the Day

January 1, 2019 by

We just got the word that “The Sentinel Chapel” adventure will be the Deal of the Day at DriveThruRPG on January 2 (starting around 11am EST; 10am CST; … Later in the day for European friends.) PDF version will be on sale for $2.97

#DragonQuest #TFT #FantasyTrip #OSR

https://www.drivethrurpg.com?affiliate_id=313167

Late in the year, as the harvest season is closing, and towns and villages are preparing for the coming winter, word has reached the group that someone is looking for a small band of adventurers for a dangerous, but well-paying task. They are to travel into the Fealhoa Valley, a region that has been deadly dangerous for the past 30 years, when it became overrun with monsters and undead creatures. A village called Cambray, several days’ travel into the Fealhoa Valley has been cut off, and no one has been in contact with that community for many years.

The adventurers are to travel to the site of a chapel located about a day’s travel from the town of Cambray and recover the silver letters on the family graves of a group of silversmiths who were originally from Cambray, and whose remaining family members now live in exile.

tactical Capture

Mixing DragonQuest and The Fantasy Trip

December 22, 2018 by

The most recent Antherwyck House Games adventure, “The Sentinel Chapel,” was written with DragonQuest rules.  But it seemed that it should be easy to convert it for use with other systems.  And now we’ve done just that with conversion notes to use the adventure with Metagaming’s (and now Steve Jackson Games) The Fantasy Trip.  The PDF is now included with the adventure files from DriveThruRPG, and can also be directly downloaded here.

TFT shares a lot with DQ.  Both are based on tactical, single-figure combat rules systems (Arena of Death from SPI, which became the DQ combat system, and the Melee Microgame, which is the TFT combat system). Both are hex-based, as well, and close enough in scale (5 foot hexes for DQ; 1.33 meter hexes for TFT, which are about 4.4 feet, so close enough for interoperability).

Beyond the functional similarities between systems, they are both systems that maintain the relative fragility of human beings.  Unlike heroic RPG systems (D&D et al) where characters level up to absurd levels of power and durability, a starting character is not that much different than an experienced one in either DQ or TFT.  And a seasoned hero can still be felled by a single well-placed blade (unlike characters who need to go through rounds and rounds of hit point attrition to wear them down).

There is also no hierarchy of classes to restrict what any players’ character can or cannot do.  There are instead, lots of talents or skills that any character can obtain, allowing for a much more interesting and unique set of abilities for any individual character to have.

I probably never really dived into the potential cross connections between the two systems, despite the fact that I played in campaigns of both as some of the earliest RPG games I was in decades ago.  Both DQ and TFT are comparatively orphan games, but with TFT making a comeback now that Steve Jackson Games has re-acquired the rights to the game, maybe things will get interesting in the coming year.

Please get in touch if you’re also a TFT player.  Having now dug out my copies of Melee, Wizard, and In the Labyrinth to work on this conversion, I’m really interested in exploring this further, and in getting feedback about this from other, more experienced TFT players.

And, if you’d like to see us issue conversions of our adventures for other game systems, let us know what you would like to see.

Marley’s Scrooge Case

December 16, 2018 by

Another local game designer has a Christmas-themed one-shot called “A Christmas One Shot: Marley’s Scrooge Case”  I haven’t played it, yet; hoping to do that in the next week or two.  It’s a $3.00 or PWYW PDF at DriveThru, and I’m trying to drive a bit more traffic his way.

 

 

 

 

Cyberpunk Adventure Draft Map

November 24, 2018 by

Sharing a work in progress here after I spent some holiday time working on a clean, digital version of the map for the Ogunimata Cyberpunk adventure.  This is turning out a lot better than I expected for what I thought would just be some rough experimentation.

It’s taken a whole lot longer than I had expected to take to get back to working on this.  Some other DragonQuest stuff took priority (and those are available at DriveThruRPG now, if you’re interested in them).

We had contemplated commissioning some art to put the whole thing together into a finished form, but there wasn’t that much interest in a Cyberpunk adventure when I posted about it earlier.  So, we’ll find some other ways of getting images to use in this.

Even if there’s not as much interior art as we had first hoped to have, there will be a pretty cool map for it.